Archive

Monthly Archives: August 2013

Some of my favorite movie characters are iconic monsters. Getting scared with monstrous creatures can be really thrilling and engaging. King Kong, Dracula, Frankenstein, the Wolf Man, the Mummy, the Invisible Man, the Phantom of the Opera, and Godzilla constitute a representative sample of the inhabitants of the pantheon of movie monsters.

 

Protagonists in these films may also include characters derived from folklore tales (Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster), “nuclear paranoia” creatures (The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms), Japanese Kaiju (Gamera), vicious animals, mutated beasts, carnivorous insects, and dinosaurs. Sci-fi inspired monstrous characters include aliens, robots, cyborgs, and mad scientists’ experiments gone wrong (normally harmless animals, plants or machines turned into cold-blooded killers).

 

“Oh, no, it wasn’t the airplanes. It was Beauty that killed the Beast.” (King Kong, 1933)

Max Steiner’s breathtaking, timeless orchestral composition was the first film score ever written for an American “talkie”. The film tells the story of a gigantic ape creature who dies in an attempt to possess a beautiful young woman. Because his actions were not entirely based on choice, and were in fact the consequence of circumstances beyond his control, the monstrous island-dweller has elicit an outpour of empathic feelings from film viewers. King Kong has become a landmark in the history of cinema, and one of the world’s most famous movie icons.

 

“It’s Alive!” (Frankenstein, 1931) is the most legendary horror movie quote.

Dr. Frankenstein creates a mate for his monster in the famous sequel Bride of Frankenstein (1933), considered by most at least an equivalent and possibly a superior film. The famous character portrayed by Boris Karloff was introduced to us in a film with no original score, but the sequel was blessed with a Franz Waxman’s early film-music masterpiece. Gothic literature elements of horror and romance percolate thought-out the score. The wonderful melody beautifully captures the sinister side of the human soul. This extremely influential composition is considered a cornerstone of horror film music.

 

” You yell ‘Barracuda,’ everybody says ‘Huh? What?’ You yell ‘Shark,’ we’ve got a panic on our hands.” (Jaws, 1975)

The John William’s theme for this movie is the most recognizable horror score of all time. Going to the beach has never been the same for most people after watching the Steven Spielberg ‘s ultimate animal terror film. He also penned the beautiful and thrilling score for Jurassic Park.

 

“Its structural perfection is matched only by its hostility… A survivor… unclouded by conscience, remorse, or delusions of morality” (Alien, 1979)

Jerry Goldsmith’s chilling, and otherworldly atmosphere of the alien ship and its monstrous inhabitant is reminiscent of his prior landmark score for Planet of the Apes. Along with the vacated Alex North’s original recording of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, it was one of the most requested and coveted soundtrack restorations. The complete original score for this monster film set in deep space was released in 2007.

 

To conclude, I will like to place in the limelight the composition that plays over the end credits of the film Cloverfield (2008). “Roar!” is a bold, creepy, exciting, and very well crafted overture by one of the emerging dramatists of contemporary film music, the “Smoke Monster” (Lost TV Series) composer Michael Giacchino. Due to similarities with the music of Akira Ifukube, it has been suggested that Giacchino’s overture is a tribute to the composer of Godzilla. Cloverfield also celebrates other legendary monster movies with embedded still frames from The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Them! and  King Kong. Monsters, like movies, will be with us forever…

 

Monster King_kong

Notable Monster Movie Scores

 

Nosferatu (1922) – Hans Erdmann / Reissue – James Bernard

The Phantom of the Opera (1925) – Gustav Hinrichs

Dracula (1931) – it did not have an original score, Philip Glass was commissioned to write the score  for the 1999 DVD release

Frankenstein (1931) – there is no musical soundtrack in the film, except for the opening and closing credits

The Mummy (1932) – ballet Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky, also previously used for the opening credits of Dracula

King Kong (1933) – Max Steiner

Bride of Frankenstein (1935) – Franz Waxman

Son of Frankenstein (1939) – Frank Skinner

The Invisible Man (1933) – Heinz Roemheld

The Invisible Man Returns (1940) – Frank Skinner

The Wolf Man (1941) – Hans J. Salter & Frank Skinner

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941) – Franz Waxman

The Ghost Of Frankenstein (1942) – Hans J. Salter

Phantom of the Opera (1943) – Edward Ward

The House of Frankenstein (1944)- Hans J. Salter

The Thing from Another World (1951) – Dimitri Tiomkin

It Came from Outer Space (1953) – collaborative score by Henry Mancini, Herman Stein, and Irving Gertz

The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953) – David Buttolph

Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954) – Hans J. Salter, contributions by Henry Mancini and Herman Stein

Godzilla (1954) – Akira Ifukube

Them! (1954) – Bronislaw Kaper

It Came from Beneath the Sea (1955) – Mischa Bakaleinikoff

Tarantula (1955) – Herman Stein and Henry Mancini

20 Million Miles to Earth (1957) – Mischa Bakaleinikoff

The Curse Of Frankenstein (1957) – James Bernard

The Mummy (1958) – Franz Reizenstein

The Horror of Dracula (1958) – James Bernard

The Giant Behemoth (1959) – Edwin Astley*

*Astley’s most memorable work is the distinctive theme music for the British TV series The Saint

Brides of Dracula (1960) – Malcolm Williamson

Curse of the Werewolf (1960) – Benjamin Frankel

Kiss of the Vampire (1962) – James Bernard

The Birds (1963) – no score

Dracula, Prince of Darkness (1966) – James Bernard

Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970) – James Bernard

Blood from the Mummy’s Tomb (1971) – Tristram Cary

Young Frankenstein (1974) – John Morris “Transylvanian Lullaby”

It’s Alive (1974) – Bernard Herrman

Jaws (1975) – John Williams

King Kong (1976) – John Barry

The Thing (1982) – Ennio Morricone

The Fly (1986) – Howard Shore

The Fly II (1989) – Christopher Young

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) – Wojciech Kilar “The Storm”

Jurassic Park (1993) – John Williams

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1994) – Patrick Doyle

Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles (1994) – Elliot Goldenthal

Mimic (1997) – Marco Beltrami

Alien Resurrection (1997) – John Frizzell

Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997 TV Series) – Nerf Herder

Godzilla (1998) – David Arnold

Lake Placid (1999) – John Ottman

The Mummy (1999) – Jerry Goldsmith

Sleepy Hollow (1999) – Danny Elfman

The Mummy Returns (2001) – Alan Silvestri

Brotherhood Of The Wolf (2001) – Joseph LoDuca

Lost (2004 TV Series) – Michael Giacchino

King Kong (2005) – James Newton Howard

Let the Right One In(2008) – Johan Soderqvist “Eli’s Theme”

Let Me In (2010) – Michael Giacchino

When I chose to undertake the “haunting” task of reviewing the horror scores for this blog, I found myself in a similar position as police chief Brody (Roy Scheider) when he realized how big his fishy nemesis monstrous shark actually was. I told myself “You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat” (Jaws, 1975). I decided to split the scores into three broad categories: Paranormal & Psychological Terror, Monster Movies, and Slasher/Splatter Films. This post is the result of my efforts in the first category.

The Paranormal includes curses, haunted-houses, ghosts, evil spirit possession, demons, Satanism, the macabre, the occult, parapsychology and other phenomena that appear outside or beside the natural. Psychological terror stories deal with the inner workings of the human mind, guilt, grief, primal fears, phobias, revulsions, emotional instability, schizophrenia or other abnormal psychology, nightmares, hallucinations, dream-like states, and other altered states of consciousness.

“La la la la… What, have they done to its eyes?!” (Rosemary’s Baby, 1968)

A disturbing baby soothing song, “Rosemary’s Lullaby”, was a perfect match for the plot of the film. A woman discovers that her pregnancy is actually part of a satanic ritual. The composer Krzysztof Komeda tragically suffered a head injury and departed this life the same year the movie had its premiere. His death foreshadowed the “curse” believed by some to be linked to the premature deaths of several people associated with other horror films. Infamous examples include the terror franchises Poltergeist, Exorcist, and Omen; as well as the films Twilight Zone: The Movie, The Crow, and Queen of the Damned.

“From the Eternal Sea, He rises, creating armies on either shore, turning man against his brother, till man exists, no more.” (The Omen, 1976)

An American ambassador is repulsed to learn that his son is the bona fide Antichrist. “Ave Satani” is a sinister choral work that bears a spine-tingling dark resemblance to a liturgical celebration. The score by Jerry Goldsmith remains to this day one of the most prominent works of the master composer, and his only Academy Award after receiving 18 nominations over the course of his career. He also demonstrated his amazing gift for macabre scoring when he wrote the frightening and chilling music for the film Poltergeist referenced above.

“The churches belong to God, but he doesn’t seem to care about them” (Don’t Look Now, 1973)

The story follows a couple working through their grief after the drowning death of their daughter. The film is based on a short story of Daphne du Maurier, the same author of Hitchcock’s Rebecca. Famed scenes of John and Laura (Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie) having explicit sex, intercut with more mundane scenes of them dressing afterwards, lived on in our memories and had caused much controversy throughout the years. The enchantingly diabolical score, composed by Pino Donaggio, emotionally submerge us in sorrow, precognition, and horror from beyond in the canals of beautiful and menacing Venice. The musician also wrote the score for Stephen King’s first novel Carrie and other Brian De Palma’s thrillers.

“A boy’s best friend is his mother.” (Psycho, 1960)

After stealing a large sum of money, a secretary arrives to the Bates Motel and encounters a young man under the control of his mother. The terror of the legendary “shower scene” is undoubtedly magnified by Bernard Herrmann’s magnum opus score. The 1959 novel Psycho by Robert Bloch served as basis for the unforgettable Alfred Hitchcock’s film.

Finally, I will like to pay homage to the master author of contemporary horror Stephen King and borrow Bloch famous quote (often misattributed to the author of Carrie, The Shining, and Misery):

“Despite my ghoulish reputation, I really have the heart of a small boy. I keep it in a jar on my desk.”

 

Psych Dont_look_now

Notable Paranormal & Psychological Terror Scores

Les Diaboliques (1955) – absence of music

The Innocents (1961) – Georges Auric and Paul Dehn

Eyes Without A Face (1962) – Maurice Jarre

The Haunting (1963) – Jehuda Ewert

Wait Until Dark (1967)  – Henry Mancini

Twisted Nerve (1968) – Bernard Herrmann

The Devil Rides Out (1968) – James Bernard

Duel (TV 1971) – Billy Goldenberg

The Exorcist (1973) – Tubular Bells by Mike Oldfield (non-original music on the soundtrack)

Sisters (1973) – Bernard Herrman

Obsession (1976) – Bernard Herrman “Valse Lente”

Carrie (1976) – Pino Donaggio “School in Flames”

Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977) – Ennio Morricone “Regan’s Theme”

The Fury (1978) – John Williams

Damien: Omen II (1978) – Jerry Goldsmith

Phantasm (1979) – Fred Myron & Malcolm Seagrave

The Fog (1980) – John Carpenter

Omen III: The Final Conflict (1981) – Jerry Goldsmith

The Changeling (1980) – Ken Wannberg, Howard Blake, Rick Wilkins

Altered States (1980) – John Corigliano

The Shining (1980) – Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta by Béla Bartók (non-original music on the soundtrack)

Evil Dead (1981) – Joseph LoDuca

The Entity (1982) – Charles Bernstein

Poltergeist (1982) – Jerry Goldsmith

Videodrome (1983) – Howard Shore

Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)- Jerry Goldsmith

Terror in the Aisles (1984) – John Beal

Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986) – Jerry Goldsmith

Ghostbusters (1986) – Elmer Bernstein

Evil Dead II (1987) – Joseph LoDuca

The Witches of Eastwick (1987) – John Williams

Beetlejuice (1988) – Danny Elfman

Dressed To Kill (1988) – Pino Donaggio

Pet Sematary (1989) – Elliot Goldenthal

Jacob’s Ladder (1990) – Maurice Jarre

Arachnophobia (1990) – Trevor Jones “Dilbert’s Theme”

Misery (1990) – Marc Shaiman

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) – Danny Elfman

Silence of the Lambs (1991) – Howard Shore

Army of Darkness [Evil Dead III] (1992) – Joseph LoDuca (except for “March of the Dead” written by Danny Elfman)

The Sixth Sense (1999) – James Newton Howard

Stir of Echoes (1999) – James Newton Howard

The Haunting (1999) – Jerry Goldsmith

Hannibal (2001) – Hans Zimmer (except for the aria “Vide Cor Meum” by Patrick Cassidy)

The Others (2001) – Alejandro Amenábar

The Ring (2002) – Hans Zimmer “This Is Going to Hurt”

The Mothman Prophecies (2002) – Tomandandy (Tom Hajdu and Andy Milburn)

Frailty (2002) – Brian Tyler

Gothika (2003) – John Ottman

The Grudge (2004) – Christopher Young

The Village (2004) – James Newton Howard

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) – Javier Navarrete

1408 (2007) – Gabriel Yared

The Mist (2007) – Mark Isham

Zodiac (2007) – David Shire “Graysmith’s Theme”

Sunshine (2007) – John Murphy “Adagio in D Minor”

Drag Me to Hell (2009) – Christopher Young

Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (2011) – Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders

Sinister (2012) – Christopher Young

The Woman in Black (2012) – Marco Beltrami