Archive

Comedy

Slapsticks, parodies, spoofs, screwballs and romantic comedy films have been brightening up our lives with laughter, humor and amusement for generations.

 

“Yes, I can see now”

In my opinion, City Lights (1931) stands at the pinnacle of both silent and romantic comedy film. The music takes us through a wide range of emotional responses as the Tramp falls in love with a blind flower girl, and develops a friendship with a millionaire. Charlie Chaplin composed a true symphony of laughs, tears, and love. Holding my hand to my heart, I rejoice with hope as I witness the triumph of the human spirit over poverty, infirmity, sorrow, and despair.

 

“I, Lord Kelvin, hereby vow to surrender my position as minister of science to Phileas Fogg if he can circumnavigate the globe… in no more than 80 days” (Around The World In 80 Days, 1956)

The unforgettable score for this adventure comedy film allow us to musically circumnavigate the globe, sampling vibrant exotic tunes as English gentleman Phileas Fogg (David Niven) and his valet Passepartout (my beloved comedian Cantinflas) progress in their 80 days journey. Victor Young was a master of melody and one of the finest film composers of his generation. Prepare to be captivated as you embark in this acoustic voyage. Like leaving Paris in a hot air balloon, it is truly an unforgettable emotional tour de force.

 

“It’s buried under a big W, I tell you. A big W” (It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, 1963)

The W stands for Wonderful. The sunny, sweet and pleasant music score by Ernest Gold sets the mood for the incredible adventures of Spencer Tracy and a very talented cast. They will endure about three hours of furiously paced tribulations, as they drive, fly, drill, dynamite, and double-cross their way to $350,000 in stolen cash. This epic comedy film and its irresistible score will stay with you forever.

 

“If you look deep into the stone, you will perceive the tiniest discoloration. It resembles an animal” (The Pink Panther, 1963)

The Pink Panther is a fictional diamond with a distinctive flaw, which resembles a leaping panther. The great Henry Mancini composed a mysterious, highly sophisticated, and utterly original theme for the Blake Edwards’ comedy masterpiece.  This beautiful, seductive, and jazzy instrumental diamond has no flaw.

 

“No, it’s pronounced Fronkensteen” (Young Frankenstein, 1974)

We may never know why the horses rear up and neigh madly in fright every time they hear the name of Fra Blucher, but we all know this Mel Brooks’ film is one of the funniest movies of all time. The black-and-white comedy features a descendant of the infamous mad scientist Dr. Frankenstein (Gene Wilder), and his re-animated creature (Peter Boyle). They dance with top hats and tails to the song “Puttin’ on the Ritz” (originally written by Irving Berlin in 1929), which parodies Fred Astaire’s Blue Skies (1946) version. The film also features a beautiful violin score “Transylvanian Lullaby” by Brooks’ longtime composer John Morris.

 

“There’s no reason to be alarmed and we hope you enjoy the rest of your flight. By the way, is there anyone on board who knows how to fly a plane?“

Airplane! (1980) is a genial spoof of airport and other disaster movies. Elmer Bernstein took his job of scoring this ridiculous parody seriously. I love the segments when he makes fun of John Williams’ Jaws. The music film auteur also wrote very well crafted compositions for the comedies Trading Places (1983), and Ghostbusters (1984).

 

Let’s close as we started with a silent romantic comedy film score, the amazing music written by Ludovic Bource for The Artist (2011). It is lighthearted, uplifting, and very emotionally touching. “I love people who make me laugh. I honestly think it’s the thing I like most, to laugh.” (Audrey Hepburn)

 

Comedy Chaplin

Notable Comedy Tunes

 

City Lights (1931) – Charles Chaplin

Modern Times (1936) – Charles Chaplin

The Three Stooges short subjects (1939 through 1959) – jazzy “Three Blind Mice”

The Philadelphia Story (1940) – Franz Waxman

The Ladykillers (1955) – Tristram Cary

Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) – Victor Young

Some Like It Hot (1959) – Adolph Deutsch

The Apartment (1960) – “Theme from The Apartment” , originally “Jealous Lover” (1949) by Charles Williams)

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) – Henry Mancini

The Pink Panther (1963) – Henry Mancini

Charade (1963) – Henry Mancini

It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963) – Ernest Gold

Casino Royale (1967) – Burt Bacharach

The Producers (1968) – John Morris

Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid (1969) – Burt Bacharach

Reivers (1969) – John Williams

MASH (1970) – Johnny Mandel

Les Aventures de Rabbi Jacob (1973) – Vladimir Cosma

The Sting (1973) – “The Entertainer”, “Solace” (Written by Scott Joplin/Conducted and Adapted by Marvin Hamlisch)

Young Frankenstein (1974) – John Morris

Blazing Saddles (1974) – John Morris

1941 (1979) – “The March From 1941” (John Williams)

Airplane! (1980) – Elmer Bernstein

Tootsie (1982) – Dave Grusin

Trading Places (1983) – Elmer Bernstein

Ghostbusters (1984) – Elmer Bernstein

Beverly Hills Cop (1984) – “Axel F” by Harold Faltermeyer

Romancing the Stone (1984) – Alan Silvestri

Back to the Future (1985) – Alan Silvestri

Pee-wee’s Big Adventure (1985) – Danny Elfman

Princess Bride (1987) – Mark Knopler

Spaceballs (1987) – John Morris

Beetlejuice (1988) – Danny Elfman

Scrooged (1988) – Danny Elfman

Big (1988) – Howard Shore

The Burbs (1989) – Jerry Goldsmith

City Slickers (1991) – Marc Shaiman

Mrs. Doubtfire (1993) – Howard Shore

Much Ado About Nothing (1993) – Patrick Doyle

Groundhog Day (1993) – George Fenton

Ed Wood (1994) – Howard Shore

Il Postino (1994) – Luis Bacalov

Emma (1996) – Rachel Portman

Life is Beautiful (1997) – Nicola Piovani

Austin Powers (1997) – “Soul Bossa Nova” (1962) by Quincy Jones

As Good As It Gets (1997) – Hans Zimmer

Chocolat (2000) – Rachel Portman

Amélie (2001) – Yann Tiersen

Sideways (2004) – Rolfe Kent

The Artist (2011) – Ludovic Bource