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“Lead me, follow me, or get the hell out of my way” (George S. Patton Jr.)

“There is no glory in battle worth the blood it costs” (Dwight D. Eisenhower)

War films range from patriotic and heroic fighting stories designed to celebrate unity and self-sacrifice for love of country, to anti-war films that depict war crimes, the disillusion of the public towards the horrors of warfare, and the negative effects war injuries and psychological stress on soldiers and returning veterans.

“We can teach these barbarians a lesson in Western methods and efficiency that will put them to shame. We’ll show them what the British soldier is capable of doing…It’s going to be a proper bridge” (The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957)

While in a prisoner of war camp, British Col. Nicholson co-operates to oversee his men’s construction of a railway bridge for their Japanese captors. Sir Malcolm Arnold incorporated in his score for the film the march Colonel Bogey, originally written in 1914 by Kenneth J. Alford (The British March King). British prisoners whistled unaccompanied the theme several times as they marched into the prison camp. Colonel Bogey inspired Arnold’s original “River Kwai March.” He won an Academy Award for the film’s score.

“I assure you I had no intention of being either harsh or cruel in my treatment of the soldier in question. My sole purpose was to try and to restore him some appreciation of his obligation as a man, and as a soldier” (Patton, 1970)

The film narrates the actions of controversial war hero General Patton during World War II. Jerry Goldsmith composed a memorable, gripping and emotional score full of high-flying marches and reverberating trumpets.

“Well, that might not be living, but it sure as hell ain’t dying. And dying’s what these white boys been doin’ for going on three years now, dying by the thousands! Dying for you, fool! I know, ‘cuz I dug the graves” (Glory, 1989)

The tragic Civil War epic inspires a stunning and very moving score from James Horner. The music is full of honor, courage, tension, and mournful melancholia. As the film, the music is very emotionally charged and uplifting.

“What are you doing? These are mine. These are my workers. They should be on my train” (Schindler’s List, 1993)

German entrepreneur Oskar Schindler saves the lives of over one thousand Polish Jews during the Holocaust. Itzhak Perlman‘s violin solos are one of the best examples of how much beauty can be contained in profoundly sad music.  This score is without doubt one of John Williams’ finest and most inspiring masterpieces.

“Captain Ramsey, under operating procedures governing the release of nuclear weapons we cannot launch our missiles unless both you, and I agree” (Crimson Tide, 1995)

A film about a young Navy Executive Officer who thinks and acts in preventing his submarine captain from launching nuclear missiles before confirming his uncertain orders to do so. “Roll Tide” is a wonderful march full of bravura and defiance. The gifted composer Hans Zimmer confidently used a large orchestra and an all male choir to gradually builds a victorious climax full of tension and thunder.

We may all have different feelings about war and its aftermath, but it is quite clear that in one way or another armed conflict will be with us forever. As the Greek philosopher Plato said, “only the dead have seen the end of war.”

War Bridge River Kwai

Notable War Film Tunes

The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) – Hugo Friedhofer

Twelve O’Clock High (1949) – Alfred Newman

Halls of Montezuma (1950) – “The Marine Hymn” (1919) by L. Z. Philips – based on the Gendarmes’ Duet from Jacques Offenbach’s opera Genevieve de Brabant

Stars and Stripes Forever (1952) is a biographical film about late composer John Philip Sousa (The American March King). He crafted some of the most famous military marches including “The Washington Post”, “The Liberty Bell” (later used as theme for Monty Python’s Flying Circus TV series) “The Thunderer”, “El Capitan”, “Semper Fidelis” (Official March of the United States Marine Corps), and “The Stars and Stripes Forever” (National March of the United States of America).

Victory at Sea (TV Documentary originally broadcast in 1952–1953, it was condensed into a film in 1954) – Richard Rodgers & Robert Russell Bennett, includes “Guadalcanal March” by Robert Russell Bennet

The Dambusters (1955) – Leighton Lucas (based on the “Dambusters March”

by Eric Coates)

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) – Malcolm Arnold

Paths of Glory (1957) “La Marseillaise” (1792) by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle

The Guns of Navarone (1961) – Dimitri Tiomkin

Combat! (1962 TV Series) – Leonard Rosenman

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) “The Voice of the Guns” (1917) by Kenneth J. Alford

The Great Escape (1963) – Elmer Bernstein

633 Squadron (1964) – Ron Goodwin

Operation Crossbow (1965) – Ron Goodwin

Hogan’s Heroes (1965 TV Series) – Jerry Fielding

The Sand Pebbles (1966) – Jerry Goldsmith

The Rat Patrol (1966 TV Series)

Where Eagles Dare (1968) – Ron Goodwin

Devil’s Brigade (1968) – Alex North

Battle of Britain (1969) – Ron Goodwin & William Walton “Aces High March” “The Battle in the Air” (Walton’s music was composed with considerable help from Malcolm Arnold, who was responsible for producing the orchestrations)

Patton (1970) – Jerry Goldsmith

M*A*S*H (1970) – Johnny Mandel

Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) – Jerry Goldsmith

Kelly’s Heroes (1970) – Lalo Schifrin

The Longest Day (1972) – Maurice Jarre

The Deer Hunter (1978) – Stanley Myers “Cavatina”

1941 (1979) – John Williams

Apocalypse Now (1979) – “Ride of the Valkyries” by Richard Wagner

A-Team (1983 TV Series) – Mike Post

Platoon (1986) – “Adagio for Strings” by Samuel Barber

Empire of the Sun (1987) – John Williams

Full Metal Jacket (1987) – “The Marines Hymn” by Jacques Offenbach from “Geneviève de Brabant”

Glory (1989) – James Horner

The Hunt For Red October (1990) – Basil Poledouris

Schindler’s List (1993) – John Williams

Crimson Tide (1995) – Hans Zimmer

Saving Private Ryan (1998) – John Williams

The Thin Red Line (1999) – Hans Zimmer

Medal of Honor (1999 Video Game) – Michael Giacchino

Gettysburg (2000) – Randy Edelman

The Patriot (2000) – John Williams

Pearl Harbor (2001) – Hans Zimmer

Band of Brothers (2002 TV Series) – Michael Kamen

Defiance (2008) – James Newton Howard

The Pacific (2010 TV Series) – Hans Zimmer, Blake Neely, Geoff Zanelli

War Horse (2011) – John Williams

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“It’s A Bird… It’s A Plane… It’s Superman”

Superheros are characters that need no introduction. We are exposed to the iconic crime fighters and protectors of the people through comics, TV series, and flicks since we are little kids. We all dreamed of possessing their extraordinary superpowers, and dressed up like them for Halloween and other costume parties.

 

Wonder Woman’s lasso and bracelets, Iron Man’s powered armor suits, Thor’s hammer, and Green Lantern’s power ring are no match for John Williams’ brilliant heroic march (Superman, 1978). The first major superhero film featuring Christopher Reeve lives in our memories and in our hearts. Get ready to be propelled into space, and fly into a fantastic and melodic journey.

 

The Joker, the Riddler, Two-Face, Poison Ivy and other psychotic criminals at the Arkham Asylum are probably asking themselves “Can somebody tell me what kind of a world do we live in, where a man dressed as a bat gets all of my press?” (Batman, 1989) The Penguin, Catwoman, and Mr. Freeze will probably tell them that is hard to compete with Bruce Wayne alter ego when he is driving the Batmobile with Danny Elfman’s “The Batman Theme” soaring in the background. The dark, gothic, powerful and mysterious superhero score is truly awesome and highly memorable.

 

The Dark Knight again landed a great musical score in the film Batman Begins (2005). Composers Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard collaboration is the second best example of how two composers can complement each other (sorry Lennon and McCartney still win). The music evokes feelings of sadness, mourning, terror, tension, and provides powerful driving music for the action scenes. “Molossus” and “Antrozous” are my favorite tracks.

 

“In a stunning turn of events, a superhero is being sued for saving someone who, apparently, didn’t want to be saved” (The Incredibles, 2004). Michael Giacchino’s score for the animated superhero movie features lots of brass, saxophone, and 1960’s spy film nostalgia. “The Glory Days” is a perfect blend of big band jazz and classic John Barry-esque music. “The Incredits” is the best superhero score for closing credits since an amazing piano piece was used for the impulsive alter ego of Dr. Bruce Banner (“The Lonely Man Theme” by Joe Harnell from The Incredible Hulk TV series, 1977).

 

“Spider-Man, Spider-Man, does whatever a spider can.” The theme song of the 1967 cartoon (re-recorded by Michael Bublé in 2002) still remains the most memorable tune for Peter Parker, despite two excellent scores penned by legendary composers Danny Elfman (Spider-Man, 2002) and James Horner (The Amazing Spider-Man, 2012).

I will also like to highlight two recent fine compositions in the Marvel superhero universe:  the great epic action romp “Driving With the Top Down” by Ramin Djawadi (Iron Man, 2008), and the soaring “Captain America March” by Alan Silvestri (Captain America: The First Avenger, 2011).

 

Finally, let’s close with the extremely memorable “Flight of the Bumblebee” (Green Hornet TV Series, 1966), arranged by Billy May from an original composition of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. It features an amazing solo by Al Hirt, a true trumpet superhero.

 

Superhero Superman

Notable Superhero Scores

 

Adventures of Superman (TV series 1952) – Leon Klatzkin “Superman March”

Batman (TV series) 1966) – Neal Hefti “Batman Theme”

Green Hornet (TV Series 1966) – Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov “Flight of the Bumblebee”

Wonder Woman (TV series 1975) – Charles Fox (music) and Norman Gimbel (lyrics)

Incredible Hulk (TV series 1977) – Joe Harnell “The Lonely Man Theme”

Superman (1978) – John Williams

Superman II (1980) – Ken Thorne

Flash (1980) – Queen

The Greatest American Hero (TV Series 1981) – Joey Scarbury

Supergirl (1984) – Jerry Goldsmith “Overture”

Robocop (1987) – Basil Poledouris

Batman (1989) – Danny Elfman “The Batman Theme”

The Punisher (1989) – Dennis Dreith

The Flash (TV Series 1990) – Danny Elfman

The Rocketeer (1991) – James Horner “To the Rescue”

Batman Returns (1992) – Danny Elfman

Batman: The Animated Series (TV Series 1992) – Shirley Walker

Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (TV Series 1993) – Jay Gruska (the son in-law of John Williams)

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (TV Series 1993) – Ron Wasserman “Go Go Power Rangers”

The Crow (1994) – Graeme Revell

Buffy the Vampire Slayer (TV Series 1994) – Nerf Herder

Superman: The Animated Series (TV Series 1996) – Shirley Walker

Batman & Robin (1997) – Elliot Goldenthal “A Batman Overture”

Spawn (1997) – Filter and the Crystal Method “(Can’t You) Trip Like I Do”

Blade (1998) – Mark Isham

Batman Beyond (TV Series 1999) – Shirley Walker

X-Men (2000) – Michael Kamen

Unbreakable (2000) – James Newton Howard “Visions”

Smallville (TV Series 2001) – Remy Zero “Save Me”

Spider-Man (2002) – Danny Elfman “Main Titles”

Blade II (2002) – Marco Beltrami

Daredevil (2003) – Graeme Revell “Daredevil Theme”

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003) – Trevor Jones

Hulk (2003) – Danny Elfman

X2: X-Men United (2003) – John Ottman “Suite from X2”

Spider-Man 2 (2004) – Danny Elfman “Main Title”

Blade: Trinity (2004) – RZA

Catwoman (2004) – Klaus Badelt

Hellboy (2004) – Marco Beltrami “Main Title”, “Fathers Funeral”

The Punisher (2004) – Carlo Siliotto

The Incredibles (2004) – Michael Giacchino

Batman Begins (2005) – Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard

Fantastic Four (2005) – John Ottman

Elektra (2005) – Christophe Beck (from Buffy and Angel TV Series)

Superman Returns (2006) – John Ottman “Main Titles”

X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) – John Powell

TMNT (2007) – Klaus Badelt

Spider-Man 3 (2007) – Christopher Young

Ghost Rider (2007) – Christopher Young

Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) – John Ottman “Silver Surfer Theme”

Iron Man (2008) – Ramin Djawadi “ Driving With the Top Down”

The Incredible Hulk (2008) – Craig Armstrong

Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008) – Danny Elfman

The Dark Knight (2008) – Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard “Aggressive Expansion”

X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) – Harry Gregson-Williams

Watchmen (2009) – Tyler Bates “Rescue Mission”

Iron Man 2 (2011) – John Debney “I Am Iron Man”

The Green Hornet (2011) – James Newton Howard

Green Lantern (2011) – James Newton Howard “We’re Going To Fly Now”

X-Men: First Class (2011) – Henry Jackman “Magneto”

Thor (2011) – Patrick Doyle “Sons of Odin”

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) – Alan Silvestri “Captain America March”

The Avengers (2012) – Alan Silvestri “The Avengers”

The Dark Knight Rises (2012) – Hans Zimmer “Rise”

The Amazing Spider-Man (2012) – James Horner “Main Title – Young Peter”, “Saving New York”

Man of Steel (2013) – Hans Zimmer

When I chose to undertake the “haunting” task of reviewing the horror scores for this blog, I found myself in a similar position as police chief Brody (Roy Scheider) when he realized how big his fishy nemesis monstrous shark actually was. I told myself “You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Boat” (Jaws, 1975). I decided to split the scores into three broad categories: Paranormal & Psychological Terror, Monster Movies, and Slasher/Splatter Films. This post is the result of my efforts in the first category.

The Paranormal includes curses, haunted-houses, ghosts, evil spirit possession, demons, Satanism, the macabre, the occult, parapsychology and other phenomena that appear outside or beside the natural. Psychological terror stories deal with the inner workings of the human mind, guilt, grief, primal fears, phobias, revulsions, emotional instability, schizophrenia or other abnormal psychology, nightmares, hallucinations, dream-like states, and other altered states of consciousness.

“La la la la… What, have they done to its eyes?!” (Rosemary’s Baby, 1968)

A disturbing baby soothing song, “Rosemary’s Lullaby”, was a perfect match for the plot of the film. A woman discovers that her pregnancy is actually part of a satanic ritual. The composer Krzysztof Komeda tragically suffered a head injury and departed this life the same year the movie had its premiere. His death foreshadowed the “curse” believed by some to be linked to the premature deaths of several people associated with other horror films. Infamous examples include the terror franchises Poltergeist, Exorcist, and Omen; as well as the films Twilight Zone: The Movie, The Crow, and Queen of the Damned.

“From the Eternal Sea, He rises, creating armies on either shore, turning man against his brother, till man exists, no more.” (The Omen, 1976)

An American ambassador is repulsed to learn that his son is the bona fide Antichrist. “Ave Satani” is a sinister choral work that bears a spine-tingling dark resemblance to a liturgical celebration. The score by Jerry Goldsmith remains to this day one of the most prominent works of the master composer, and his only Academy Award after receiving 18 nominations over the course of his career. He also demonstrated his amazing gift for macabre scoring when he wrote the frightening and chilling music for the film Poltergeist referenced above.

“The churches belong to God, but he doesn’t seem to care about them” (Don’t Look Now, 1973)

The story follows a couple working through their grief after the drowning death of their daughter. The film is based on a short story of Daphne du Maurier, the same author of Hitchcock’s Rebecca. Famed scenes of John and Laura (Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie) having explicit sex, intercut with more mundane scenes of them dressing afterwards, lived on in our memories and had caused much controversy throughout the years. The enchantingly diabolical score, composed by Pino Donaggio, emotionally submerge us in sorrow, precognition, and horror from beyond in the canals of beautiful and menacing Venice. The musician also wrote the score for Stephen King’s first novel Carrie and other Brian De Palma’s thrillers.

“A boy’s best friend is his mother.” (Psycho, 1960)

After stealing a large sum of money, a secretary arrives to the Bates Motel and encounters a young man under the control of his mother. The terror of the legendary “shower scene” is undoubtedly magnified by Bernard Herrmann’s magnum opus score. The 1959 novel Psycho by Robert Bloch served as basis for the unforgettable Alfred Hitchcock’s film.

Finally, I will like to pay homage to the master author of contemporary horror Stephen King and borrow Bloch famous quote (often misattributed to the author of Carrie, The Shining, and Misery):

“Despite my ghoulish reputation, I really have the heart of a small boy. I keep it in a jar on my desk.”

 

Psych Dont_look_now

Notable Paranormal & Psychological Terror Scores

Les Diaboliques (1955) – absence of music

The Innocents (1961) – Georges Auric and Paul Dehn

Eyes Without A Face (1962) – Maurice Jarre

The Haunting (1963) – Jehuda Ewert

Wait Until Dark (1967)  – Henry Mancini

Twisted Nerve (1968) – Bernard Herrmann

The Devil Rides Out (1968) – James Bernard

Duel (TV 1971) – Billy Goldenberg

The Exorcist (1973) – Tubular Bells by Mike Oldfield (non-original music on the soundtrack)

Sisters (1973) – Bernard Herrman

Obsession (1976) – Bernard Herrman “Valse Lente”

Carrie (1976) – Pino Donaggio “School in Flames”

Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977) – Ennio Morricone “Regan’s Theme”

The Fury (1978) – John Williams

Damien: Omen II (1978) – Jerry Goldsmith

Phantasm (1979) – Fred Myron & Malcolm Seagrave

The Fog (1980) – John Carpenter

Omen III: The Final Conflict (1981) – Jerry Goldsmith

The Changeling (1980) – Ken Wannberg, Howard Blake, Rick Wilkins

Altered States (1980) – John Corigliano

The Shining (1980) – Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta by Béla Bartók (non-original music on the soundtrack)

Evil Dead (1981) – Joseph LoDuca

The Entity (1982) – Charles Bernstein

Poltergeist (1982) – Jerry Goldsmith

Videodrome (1983) – Howard Shore

Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)- Jerry Goldsmith

Terror in the Aisles (1984) – John Beal

Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986) – Jerry Goldsmith

Ghostbusters (1986) – Elmer Bernstein

Evil Dead II (1987) – Joseph LoDuca

The Witches of Eastwick (1987) – John Williams

Beetlejuice (1988) – Danny Elfman

Dressed To Kill (1988) – Pino Donaggio

Pet Sematary (1989) – Elliot Goldenthal

Jacob’s Ladder (1990) – Maurice Jarre

Arachnophobia (1990) – Trevor Jones “Dilbert’s Theme”

Misery (1990) – Marc Shaiman

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) – Danny Elfman

Silence of the Lambs (1991) – Howard Shore

Army of Darkness [Evil Dead III] (1992) – Joseph LoDuca (except for “March of the Dead” written by Danny Elfman)

The Sixth Sense (1999) – James Newton Howard

Stir of Echoes (1999) – James Newton Howard

The Haunting (1999) – Jerry Goldsmith

Hannibal (2001) – Hans Zimmer (except for the aria “Vide Cor Meum” by Patrick Cassidy)

The Others (2001) – Alejandro Amenábar

The Ring (2002) – Hans Zimmer “This Is Going to Hurt”

The Mothman Prophecies (2002) – Tomandandy (Tom Hajdu and Andy Milburn)

Frailty (2002) – Brian Tyler

Gothika (2003) – John Ottman

The Grudge (2004) – Christopher Young

The Village (2004) – James Newton Howard

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) – Javier Navarrete

1408 (2007) – Gabriel Yared

The Mist (2007) – Mark Isham

Zodiac (2007) – David Shire “Graysmith’s Theme”

Sunshine (2007) – John Murphy “Adagio in D Minor”

Drag Me to Hell (2009) – Christopher Young

Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (2011) – Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders

Sinister (2012) – Christopher Young

The Woman in Black (2012) – Marco Beltrami