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Star-crossed lovers must overcome pride, feuding families, societal classes and conventions, prior marriages or engagements, racial prejudice, cultural barriers, physical and mental illness, temporal and physical distance, wars, revolutions, and even death itself. Montague and Capulet supporters alike would agree that some of the most beautiful film music has been inspired by the very powerful force that is romantic love.

“I didn’t want to be born. You didn’t want me to be born. It’s been a calamity on both sides.” (Now, Voyager, 1942)

Charlotte Vale (Bette Davis) defies her overbearing mother and goes on to discover love, heartbreak and eventual fulfillment. The fantastic and genial Max Steiner, the father of film composers, created one of his most lavishing masterpieces for this romantic psychological drama.

“I love you. I’ve loved you since the first moment I saw you. I guess maybe I’ve even loved you before I saw you.” (A Place In The Sun, 1951)

One of the best love stories ever-rendered into glorious black and white film. Young, ambitious George Eastman (who is now in love with rich, gorgeous, and sophisticated society girl Angela Vickers) sees his promising future; dreams and fantasies crash due to the unexpected pregnancy of his former flame factory worker Alice Tripp. Some decisions have tragic consequences. Franz Waxman composed an exquisitely romantic score with sinister undertones, the perfect match for this tragic love story.

“You call yourself a free spirit, a wild thing, and you’re terrified somebody’s going to stick you in a cage. Well, baby, you’re already in that cage. You built it yourself… It’s wherever you go. Because no matter where you run, you just end up running into yourself.” (Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961)

I love Audrey Hepburn’s soothing voice singing the breathtaking song “Moon River”.  It is hard to contain your emotions in the presence of a melody of such grace and beauty. Let the uplifting and transcendent score of the dream maker and heartbreaker Henry Mancini flow through us and inspire our spirits. Like a vessel adrift in a powerful musical river, “wherever you’re going I’m going your way.“

“I know everything I need to know about you. I love you. I know you’re good, and kind. I know you’re colored and I… And I think you’re beautiful!” (A Patch of Blue, 1965)

By judging one another based on the content of their characters, and placing the needs of the other before their own, selfless love transcends racism and prejudice in this touching, bittersweet, and heartbreaking inter-racial romance in the 1960s. It tells the love story of an uneducated abused blind white girl, and a kind well-educated black businessman.  Jerry Goldsmith beaded a gorgeous musical necklace for this wonderful and heart warming film.

“I shouldn’t admire it now. I should find it absurdly personal. Don’t you agree? Feelings, insights, affections … it’s suddenly trivial now. You don’t agree; you’re wrong. The personal life is dead in Russia. History has killed it.” (Doctor Zhivago, 1965)

Maurice Jarre crafted exquisite musical poetry that mends our souls. Verses of love and passion will always find admirers despite the poisonous doctrines and the incredible hardships imposed by oppressive regimes. The human spirit continues to endure and triumph, while the Bolshevik Revolution shrinks to a dark footnote in history.

“Winning that ticket, Rose, was the best thing that ever happened to me… it brought me to you. And I’m thankful for that, Rose. I’m thankful. You must do me this honor. You must promise me that you’ll survive, that you won’t give up, no matter what happens, no matter how hopeless. Promise me now, Rose, and never let go of that promise.” (Titanic, 1997)

James Horner glorious score is without doubt his crowning achievement. Celine Dion’s performance of “My Heart Goes On” still gives me goose bumps. The brief but enduring romance between a poor artist boy and a rich aristocrat girl aboard the luxurious, ill-fated R.M.S. Titanic is certainly an inspirational story. James Cameron was truly “the king of the world” in 1997.

Love Titanic

Notable Romantic Film Tunes

City Lights (1931) – Charles Chaplin (previously featured in Comedy Tunes)

The Gay Divorcee (1934) – Max Steiner

Anthony Adverse (1936) – Erich Wolfgang Korngold

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) – Erich Wolfgang Korngold

Gone with the Wind (1939) – Max Steiner (previously featured in Epic Film Tunes)

Wuthering Heights (1939) – Alfred Newman

Dark Victory (1939) – Max Steiner

The Philadelphia Story (1940) – Franz Waxman

Now, Voyager (1942) – Max Steiner

Casablanca (1942) – Max Steiner

Kings Row (1942) – Erich Wolfgang Korngold

Jane Eyre (1944) – Bernard Herrmann

Beauty and the Beast (1946) – Georges Auric

Forever Amber (1947) – David Raksin

The Adventures of Don Juan (1948) – Max Steiner

A Place in the Sun (1951) – Franz Waxman

The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) – David Raksin

Moulin Rouge (1952) – Georges Auric, William Engvick

Roman Holiday (1953) – Georges Auric

Sabrina (1954) – Frederick Hollander

Summertime (1955) – Alessandro Cicognini

East of Eden (1955) – Leonard Rosenman

Picnic (1955) – George Duning

Love Is A Many-Splendored Thing (1955) – Alfred Newman

Peyton Place (1957) – Franz Waxman

An Affair To Remember (1957) – Hugo Friedhofer

A Summer Place (1959) – Max Steiner

The Apartment (1960) – Adolph Deutsch, “Theme from The Apartment” (originally “Jealous Lover”, 1949) by British composer Charles Williams

Summer and Smoke (1961) – Elmer Bernstein

Splendor in the Grass (1961) – David Amram

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) – Henry Mancini

Walk On The Wild Side (1962) – Elmer Bernstein

Charade (1963) – Henry Mancini

Cleopatra (1963)- Alex North

Doctor Zhivago (1965) – Maurice Jarre

A Patch of Blue (1965) – Jerry Goldsmith

Far From The Madding Crowd (1967) – Richard Rodney Bennett

Romeo and Juliet (1968) – Nino Rota

Love Story (1970) – Francis Lai

Wuthering Heights (1970) – Michel Legrand

Summer of 42′ (1971) – Michel Legrand

The Way We Were (1973) – Marvin Hamlisch

Somewhere In Time (1980) – John Barry

Romancing the Stone (1984) – Alan Silvestri

A Room with a View (1985) – Richard Robbins

Out of Africa (1985) – John Barry (previously featured in Epic Film Tunes)

St. Elmo’s Fire (1985) – David Foster

Dangerous Liaisons (1988) – George Fenton

Ghost (1990) “Unchained Melody” (originally from the film Unchained, 1955) by Alex North)

Howards End (1992) – Richard Robbins

Remains of the Day (1993) – Richard Robbins

The Piano (1993) – Michael Nyman

Much Ado About Nothing (1993) – Patrick Doyle

Age of Innocence (1993) – Elmer Bernstein

Forrest Gump (1994) – Alan Silvestri

Il Postino (1994) – Luis Enríquez Bacalov

The American President (1995) – Marc Shaiman

Sense And Sensibility (1995) – Patrick Doyle

The English Patient (1996) – Gabriel Yared

Emma (1996) – Rachel Portman

Titanic (1997)- James Horner

As Good as it Gets (1997) – Hans Zimmer

Life is Beautiful (1998)- Nicola Piovani

Shakespeare in Love (1998) – Stephen Warbeck

The Red Violin (1999) – John Corigliano

The Cider House Rules (1999) – Rachel Portman

Chocolat (2000) – Rachel Portman

Amelie (2001) – Yann Tiersen

Pearl Harbor (2001) – Hans Zimmer

Girl With A Pearl Earring (2003) – Alexandre Desplat

Pride & Prejudice (2005) – Dario Marianelli

Jane Eyre (2011) – Dario Marianelli

The Artist (2011) – Ludovic Bource (previously feature in Comedy Tunes)

Anna Karenina (2012) – Dario Marianelli

Romeo and Juliet (2013) – Abel Korzeniowski

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There is an incredibly rich tradition of sport inspired and related music deeply ingrained in our collective psyche. Let’s eat “some peanuts and Cracker Jack” (Take Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth, 1908) while we celebrate magnificent tunes from outstanding sport related films.

 

“You’re gonna eat lightnin’ and you’re gonna crap thunder!” (Rocky, 1976)

The greatest underdog sports movie triumphs at multiple levels. A true hero fighting for love and honor emerges with glory from a valiant defeat to inspire a nation. Bill Conti’s “Gonna Fly Now” is an extraordinarily powerful anthem and one of the most recognizable film themes ever. Like Rocky Balboa, the inspirational and very moving score is a bona fide champion and a genuine winner.

 

“I believe God made me for a purpose, but he also made me fast. And when I run I feel His pleasure.” (Chariots of Fire, 1981)

The genial synthesizer composer Vangelis crafted one of the most memorable soundtracks of all time for this heroic and transcendent racing drama. The composition is passionate, riveting, stimulating and extraordinarily moving. His music for this film bested steep competition (On Golden Pond, Raiders of the Lost Ark) and won the Academy Award for best original score.

 

“Well you’re better than any player I ever had. And you’re the best God damn hitter I ever saw. Suit up.” (The Natural, 1984)

The movie tells the story of Roy Hobbs, a man with incredible raw talent who is struck down in his prime, but gets a second chance to fulfill his dream of athletic glory through determination and integrity. The music by Randy Newman is sweetly nostalgic, and truly inspirational. It transports us to simpler and better time. Aaron Copeland would have considered it a Grand Slam.

 

“If you put your effort and concentration into playing to your potential, to be the best that you can be, I don’t care what the scoreboard says at the end of the game, in my book we’re gonna be winners.” (Hoosiers, 1986)

Considered by many the greatest sports film of all time, it is the story of Coach Norman Dale and his underdog basketball team rising to the challenge, and beating the odds. It highlights finding redemption, second chance at success, love for basketball, innocence of youth, and majestic rural Americana. The heartfelt and stirring score by Jerry Goldsmith has a beautiful and sublime melody. Prepared to be inspired, uplifted, touched and enlightened, while you try in vain to hold back your tears.

 

“If you build it, he will come.” (Field of Dreams, 1989)

A struggling Iowa farmer transforms a cornfield into a baseball diamond and a spiritual portal. Nostalgia for baseball’s Golden Age drives multitude of fans to visit the field where Shoeless Joe Jackson’s ghost comes to play the greatest game ever invented. James Horner’s subtle but mesmerizing music lift our hearts and spirits. It is the perfect companion for this beautiful, enchanting and heartbreakingly charming baseball fantasy.

 

“The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering.” (Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, 1993)

The film is a celebration of the live and myth of the kung fu film star, an inspired man who through great effort and self-confidence would become martial-arts most enduring legend.  The moving score by Randy Edelman is powerful and captivating, an emotional tour de force and an instant classic.

 

As eloquently stated by master composer John Williams, sport tunes are intended to musically represent “the spirit of cooperation, of heroic achievement, all the striving and preparation that go before the events and all the applause that comes after them.” (In reference to his composition Olympic Fanfare and Theme, 1984)

 

Sport Hoosiers

Notable Sport Film Tunes

Brian’s Song (1971 TV Movie) – Michel Legrand “The Hands of Time”

Rocky (1976) – Bill Conty “Gonna Fly Now”

Ice Castles (1978)-Marvin Hamlisch

The Champ (1979) – Dave Grusin

Victory (1981)- Bill Conti

Chariots of Fire (1981) – Vangelis

The Natural (1984) – Randy Newman

Hoosiers (1986) – Jerry Goldsmith

Lucas (1986) – Dave Grusin

Field of Dreams (1989) – James Horner

A League of Their Own (1992) – Hans Zimmer

Dragon : The Bruce Lee Story  (1993) – Randy Edelman “The Dragon’s Heartbeat”

Rudy (1993)– Jerry Goldsmith

Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993) – James Horner

Cobb (1995) – Elliot Goldenthal

Space Jam (1996) – James Newton Howard

Finding Forrester (2000) – Israel Kamakwiwo’ole “Over the Rainbow/What a Wonderful World”

61* (2001 TV Movie) – Marc Shaiman

The Rookie (2002) – Carter Burwell

Seabiscuit (2003)- Randy Newman

Miracle (2004) – Mark Isham

Million Dollar Baby (2005) – Clint Eastwood

Speed Racer (2008) –  Michael Giacchino

Moneyball (2011) – Michael Danna

Soul Surfer (2011) – Marco Beltrami

Warrior (2011) – Mark Isham

 

“Lead me, follow me, or get the hell out of my way” (George S. Patton Jr.)

“There is no glory in battle worth the blood it costs” (Dwight D. Eisenhower)

War films range from patriotic and heroic fighting stories designed to celebrate unity and self-sacrifice for love of country, to anti-war films that depict war crimes, the disillusion of the public towards the horrors of warfare, and the negative effects war injuries and psychological stress on soldiers and returning veterans.

“We can teach these barbarians a lesson in Western methods and efficiency that will put them to shame. We’ll show them what the British soldier is capable of doing…It’s going to be a proper bridge” (The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957)

While in a prisoner of war camp, British Col. Nicholson co-operates to oversee his men’s construction of a railway bridge for their Japanese captors. Sir Malcolm Arnold incorporated in his score for the film the march Colonel Bogey, originally written in 1914 by Kenneth J. Alford (The British March King). British prisoners whistled unaccompanied the theme several times as they marched into the prison camp. Colonel Bogey inspired Arnold’s original “River Kwai March.” He won an Academy Award for the film’s score.

“I assure you I had no intention of being either harsh or cruel in my treatment of the soldier in question. My sole purpose was to try and to restore him some appreciation of his obligation as a man, and as a soldier” (Patton, 1970)

The film narrates the actions of controversial war hero General Patton during World War II. Jerry Goldsmith composed a memorable, gripping and emotional score full of high-flying marches and reverberating trumpets.

“Well, that might not be living, but it sure as hell ain’t dying. And dying’s what these white boys been doin’ for going on three years now, dying by the thousands! Dying for you, fool! I know, ‘cuz I dug the graves” (Glory, 1989)

The tragic Civil War epic inspires a stunning and very moving score from James Horner. The music is full of honor, courage, tension, and mournful melancholia. As the film, the music is very emotionally charged and uplifting.

“What are you doing? These are mine. These are my workers. They should be on my train” (Schindler’s List, 1993)

German entrepreneur Oskar Schindler saves the lives of over one thousand Polish Jews during the Holocaust. Itzhak Perlman‘s violin solos are one of the best examples of how much beauty can be contained in profoundly sad music.  This score is without doubt one of John Williams’ finest and most inspiring masterpieces.

“Captain Ramsey, under operating procedures governing the release of nuclear weapons we cannot launch our missiles unless both you, and I agree” (Crimson Tide, 1995)

A film about a young Navy Executive Officer who thinks and acts in preventing his submarine captain from launching nuclear missiles before confirming his uncertain orders to do so. “Roll Tide” is a wonderful march full of bravura and defiance. The gifted composer Hans Zimmer confidently used a large orchestra and an all male choir to gradually builds a victorious climax full of tension and thunder.

We may all have different feelings about war and its aftermath, but it is quite clear that in one way or another armed conflict will be with us forever. As the Greek philosopher Plato said, “only the dead have seen the end of war.”

War Bridge River Kwai

Notable War Film Tunes

The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) – Hugo Friedhofer

Twelve O’Clock High (1949) – Alfred Newman

Halls of Montezuma (1950) – “The Marine Hymn” (1919) by L. Z. Philips – based on the Gendarmes’ Duet from Jacques Offenbach’s opera Genevieve de Brabant

Stars and Stripes Forever (1952) is a biographical film about late composer John Philip Sousa (The American March King). He crafted some of the most famous military marches including “The Washington Post”, “The Liberty Bell” (later used as theme for Monty Python’s Flying Circus TV series) “The Thunderer”, “El Capitan”, “Semper Fidelis” (Official March of the United States Marine Corps), and “The Stars and Stripes Forever” (National March of the United States of America).

Victory at Sea (TV Documentary originally broadcast in 1952–1953, it was condensed into a film in 1954) – Richard Rodgers & Robert Russell Bennett, includes “Guadalcanal March” by Robert Russell Bennet

The Dambusters (1955) – Leighton Lucas (based on the “Dambusters March”

by Eric Coates)

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) – Malcolm Arnold

Paths of Glory (1957) “La Marseillaise” (1792) by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle

The Guns of Navarone (1961) – Dimitri Tiomkin

Combat! (1962 TV Series) – Leonard Rosenman

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) “The Voice of the Guns” (1917) by Kenneth J. Alford

The Great Escape (1963) – Elmer Bernstein

633 Squadron (1964) – Ron Goodwin

Operation Crossbow (1965) – Ron Goodwin

Hogan’s Heroes (1965 TV Series) – Jerry Fielding

The Sand Pebbles (1966) – Jerry Goldsmith

The Rat Patrol (1966 TV Series)

Where Eagles Dare (1968) – Ron Goodwin

Devil’s Brigade (1968) – Alex North

Battle of Britain (1969) – Ron Goodwin & William Walton “Aces High March” “The Battle in the Air” (Walton’s music was composed with considerable help from Malcolm Arnold, who was responsible for producing the orchestrations)

Patton (1970) – Jerry Goldsmith

M*A*S*H (1970) – Johnny Mandel

Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) – Jerry Goldsmith

Kelly’s Heroes (1970) – Lalo Schifrin

The Longest Day (1972) – Maurice Jarre

The Deer Hunter (1978) – Stanley Myers “Cavatina”

1941 (1979) – John Williams

Apocalypse Now (1979) – “Ride of the Valkyries” by Richard Wagner

A-Team (1983 TV Series) – Mike Post

Platoon (1986) – “Adagio for Strings” by Samuel Barber

Empire of the Sun (1987) – John Williams

Full Metal Jacket (1987) – “The Marines Hymn” by Jacques Offenbach from “Geneviève de Brabant”

Glory (1989) – James Horner

The Hunt For Red October (1990) – Basil Poledouris

Schindler’s List (1993) – John Williams

Crimson Tide (1995) – Hans Zimmer

Saving Private Ryan (1998) – John Williams

The Thin Red Line (1999) – Hans Zimmer

Medal of Honor (1999 Video Game) – Michael Giacchino

Gettysburg (2000) – Randy Edelman

The Patriot (2000) – John Williams

Pearl Harbor (2001) – Hans Zimmer

Band of Brothers (2002 TV Series) – Michael Kamen

Defiance (2008) – James Newton Howard

The Pacific (2010 TV Series) – Hans Zimmer, Blake Neely, Geoff Zanelli

War Horse (2011) – John Williams